A hundred years ago, the rural parish of Sutton Mandeville hosted thousands of soldiers in camps either side of today’s A30. Between 1915 and 1918 several different units were based here, preparing soldiers for service on the Western Front.

There are few signs of these camps today, but soldiers from two regiments also left carvings of their cap badges cut into the downs: the 7th (City of London) Battalion of the London Regiment (known as the ‘Shiny Seventh’); and the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

After the First World War the two badges at Sutton Mandeville were periodically maintained for about 70 years. From the 1990s onwards they became quite overgrown and almost lost from sight. With the support of the Heritage Lottery Fund and others we are finding out about the soldiers who once lived here, and working to ensure that the Sutton Badges take their place in the landscape once again.

The Royal Warwickshire badge nearing the completion of its restoration


Major grant from National Lottery to restore Royal Warwickshire Regiment badge

Sutton Mandeville Heritage Trust is very pleased to report that it has received a grant of £88,300 from the Heritage Lottery Fund ...
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Centenary of the Shiny 7th Badge

April 5th 2016 is the centenary of the Shiny 7th badge cut into the hillside in Sutton Mandeville. It was ...
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The Royal Field Artillery in Sutton Mandeville – preparing for the Somme

Maps from the First World War indicate that the camps at Sutton Mandeville were used by the Royal Field Artillery ...
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Public Meeting, 20 May 2013

We held our first public meeting about the Sutton Down Badges in May 2013, at all Saints Church in Sutton ...
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